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Specialized Personal Assistance

Specialized Personal Assistance

Specialized Personal Assistance is an enhanced service for individuals who have more challenging behaviors – like physical or verbal aggression, property destruction, self-injury, self-stimulation, or elopement – and therefore need more support than traditional in-home respite can provide. The service is appropriate for individuals of any age.

Our specialized personal assistance services fall into three categories:

Respite: A support service designed to provide parents and other primary caregivers with temporary relief from the constant care required by a family member with special needs. Respite is provided in the individual’s own home.

Daycare: Provides care to an individual in their home environment while the parents or other primary caregivers are working or attending an educational program.

Attendant Care: Provides an extra set of hands to individuals who need support completing their activities of daily living. This service can support a wide variety of needs and can be provided in the individual’s home, community environment, or in other facilities such as a group home. For individuals with severe behavioral needs, attendant care can be used as an extra layer of support for other services such as ABA-based behavioral therapy. This service is offered as 1:1 or 2:1.

Specialized personal assistance services can only be provided for the individual authorized for care. Sessions can be as short in duration as 2 hours, or services can be provided 24/7 depending on the needs of the individual. Prior to initiating care, a supervisor conducts an initial appointment to understand the needs of the specific individual and family and identifies care providers who are a good match. A supervisor is assigned to every specialized personal assistance case.

Our team of specialized personal assistance professionals are experienced and passionate about working with individuals who have developmental disabilities. All our care providers are trained in Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) principles and collaborate with the individual’s ABA service provider to ensure consistency in implementation of the behavior treatment plan. In addition, all our care providers have passed a live scan clearance as validated by DOJ and FBI, maintain current CPR and First Aid certification, and are certified in Non-Violent Crisis Prevention and Intervention (NCPI).

Who Pays for Personal Assistance Services?

In the state of California, the local Regional Center will authorize and pay for appropriate and necessary services for any individual assessed and diagnosed with a developmental disability. The state defines developmental disability as “intellectual disability, autism, cerebral palsy, epilepsy and other conditions similar to intellectual disability that require treatment similar to a person with intellectual disability.”

The state will pay for services for individuals at any income level as long as the need for services is demonstrated. The number of hours is dependent on each particular case or need but is typically 30 hours per month.

Parents and other primary caregivers can also receive specialized personal assistance services under a self-pay arrangement, paying for services directly as needed.

Other Options

Individuals who don’t require the more intensive level of support provided though our specialized personal assistance services can receive similar services through our Traditional In-Home Respite services.

Services Provided By:

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